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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
the threat of default or downgrade. >> ron insana there. meanwhile, u.s. troops in afghanistan are worried they may not get paid because of this debt showdown in washington. gener good saturday morning to you, atia. so what was this meeting with the troops like? >> reporter: good morning, alex. the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mullen, made his way down to the southern part of afghanistan, the most volatile part in the country. his number one question from the soldiers, airmen, sailors and marines wasn't necessarily about the military strategy but it was, will we get paid. and his response was, i actually don't know the answer to that question. i have confidence that at some point in time whatever compensation you are owed you will be given. obviously the americans here in afghanistan, very worried about what's going on in washington. many of these men and women haven't seen their families for several months. many won't see them for a full year and they're wondering if those family members are going to be getting those paychecks. they're risking their lives here in afghani
services and a surge of combat vets from the iraq and afghanistan wars entering the system, the demand for v.a. health care services has increased dramatically in recent years. this bill provides $58.6 billion for v.a. discretionary funding, $2.3 billion over current funding. the bill also includes $52.5 billion in fy 2013 advanced appropriations for vets' medical care. one of the very few areas in which this bill provides an increase in funding is v.a. medical research, which is $72 million over the budget request to restore funding to the current level. with little room to maneuver on the v.a. side of the ledger, the vast majority of the savings in the bill comes from incrementing or defunding certain military construction projects. the bill provides $13.7 billion for military construction, $1 billion below the request. the milcon reductions in the bill are restricted to the active-duty components. the guard and reserve components, family housing, barrack and other accounts are fully funded at the president's request. every military construction project funded in this bill is authori
to decide on holding a new trial. a suicide bomber in afghanistan killed five people today at a memorial service for ahmed wali karzai-- half-brother of the afghan president. the bomber blew himself up at a kandahar mosque where the service was under way. president karzai was not attending. the attack came as a u.n. report said afghan civilian deaths are up 15 percent from a year ago. officials with the u.n. assistance mission in afghanistan blamed 80% of the killings on insurgents. >> this dramatic growth was mainly due to the use of landmine-like pressure plate, improvised explosive devices or i.e.d.s by the anti-government elements. we at unnama documented 1,462 civilian deaths. >> sreenivasan: nato air strikes -- mainly involving helicopters -- were the leading cause of civilian deaths by international forces. the first american combat forces began leaving afghanistan today as part of a gradual pull-out. army national guard units from iowa boarded a military plane at the bagram airbase terminal. they're among some 1,000 troops set to leave afghanistan this month. last month, presiden
, that's clear, isn't it? so there he was, he was making his 15th trip to afghanistan and it was while he was over at camp leatherneck that the marines asked him, okay, if there are a bunch of pentagon cuts, how is that going to affect our equipment and stuff like that. and wherever he has gone so far during this particular swing through the country of afghanistan, the troops are saying are we going to get paid? and he's saying, i don't know. just know this whatever you are owed you'll get paid eventually. you know, and this is how this works down. if we do, talking about if we go into a debt ceiling where we can't pay our bills technically which i don't agree with anyway, let's say, the president has the tablt to decide who gets paid when. clearly the debt is going to get paid first. china and saudi arabia are paid before our military, as bad as that sounds, that has to happen, so our borrowing costs don't go through the roof and then pay the military and social security, and if you dodonn tt order, give the department of education money first, it's the president's fault. it's not congre
, reduced spending on the wars in afghanistan and iraq and through targeted cuts to mandatory spending. it doesn't raise taxes and it doesn't touch medicare, medicaid or social security. again, this is not a perfect plan. i have been on the floor many times in favor of a balanced package that includes cuts to spending, domestic, defense and mandatory, but also includes increased revenues. the reid princess plan doesn't e those goals -- the reid plan doesn't achieve those goals but i hope we will get there eventually. this is not a proposal i would have written, but i'm one of more than 100 members of the senate and more than 535 members of congress, and i don't get everything i want. none of us here in congress get everything we want. that's the nature of compromise. that's the nature of democracy, and that's why the framers of the constitution created checks and balances in government. that's why they created two chambers in congress and three branches of government, and when you're a leader in government, you just don't have the luxury of drawing a line in the sand and walking away.
. ♪ welcome back. american troops in afghanistan worried about how the debt talks standoff could impact their families with the deal doesn't happen by tuesday and federal employees stop getting paid. soldiers asked admiral mike mullen if they will still get their pay checks. he said honestly he just doesn't know what will happen. >>> mullen was meeting with service men and women at bases in southern afghanistan. >> but the money does seem to be flowing in iraq and in ways that are taking the american taxpayer for a ride. a new report by a special inspector shows that contractors are overbilling the government by as much as 12,000%. in one case a sub contractor charged the pentagon 900 bucks for a $7 switch. and the audit comes as violence in iraq is surging. steve centanni is live for us in washington. so steve, first, what about the allegations that iraq is not any safer than it was a year ago? >> well, heather, that is the claim of the inspector general for iraq reconstruction in a scathing report just released he says "iraq remains an extraordinarily dangerous place to work. it is le
of pride it is as we go across afghanistan and iraq to visit those young guardsmen. truly, they are magnificent in how they serve, what they do. let me tell you, it is good to be in the mile high city. always good to get up on the high ground so you can survey what is going on around you. particularly when you are headed into a conflict. [laughter] conservatives already hold the high ground of ideas, but this conference provides a vantage point with a view of the challenges that lay ahead for us as we go forward in this country. you know, over the next 17 months, i believe america will undergo some tough times as we begin the process of crawling and domesticating a beast known as the federal government. [applause] my concern is not only that washington has intruded upon the rights of the state's and individuals to make decisions about our own health care, our small businesses, our money, but that it is also advocating one of its most -- advocating one of its most basic duties, which is defending our borders. [applause] i always thought that government was supposed to do th
or daughter, husband or wife is in iraq or afghanistan, might cost them their check if we get three or four or of six days past august 2nd. >> i heard you say earlier we're seeing a generational divide in the house right now, the results of a generational divide. >> no question in the republican party there's a huge generational divide. as gloria just noted, a lot of these 87 freshmen, they're not career politicians. they were car dealers, maybe they were prosecutors. some of them were farmers. they don't feel bebeholden to the speaker. they think the people telling them to compromise are the people who built the pile of debt, the miss we're in right now. they don't truss them. remember a lot of people are making fun of them. a lot of people say these crazy tea party party. why won't they compromise? they won the last election. the last time america spoke they sent these people to washington. so they think that's what they were sent here to do. now, maybe the public's changed its mind. maybe the president and democrats have convinced them otherwise. but they just in november won an election
wars in iraq and afghanistan and participate in the nato exercise in libya. that's pretty expensive undertaking. we know that that has gone up 84%, military spending, in the last ten years, gone up 84%. we know at the same period of time that spending on mandatory programs -- that would be like social security, medicare, medicaid, agriculture payments, veterans payments. spending for those payments over the last ten years has gone up 32%. and we know that the rest of the budget, the so-called domestic discretionary spending which would include things like building highways, keeping federal prisons open, providing pell grants to college students, giving children from poor families early childhood education, putting money at the national institutes of health for madam chair research. that's one section of the budget. it comprises 12% of our budget. in the last ten years that part of our budget has gone up zero percent. no increase in spending in that section. most of our spending goes into the military, 84% increase over ten years, and mandatory programs, 32% over ten years. the bigge
, not talking about wars in iraq and afghanistan, not talking about natural disasters, disease, epidemics, not famine. i'm talking about our national debt. our national debt is the threat. it is the great e threa greatesr national security. i'll tell you this isn't a problem for one party, the other party, it is a problem for all of us as americans. now, i'm not the only one that's saying it. actually, the chairman of the -- of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, has said the most significant threat, the most significant threat to our nation's security is our debt. let me repeat, the most significant threat to our national security is the debt. you may notice, mr. president, that admiral mullen makes no mention at all of the debt ceiling. the presiding officer: would the senator from wyoming cease for a minute. could we have order, please. mr. barrasso: thank you, mr. president. the presiding officer: the senator from wyoming may continue. mr. barrasso: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, as i was saying, you will note that admiral mullen makes -- makes no mention at all
savings based on savings on troop levels in iraq and afghanistan. >> well, interesting enough while they're calling the overseas contingency operation dollars phantom funds, anderson, you may know they used those funds and put them in their own budget that they've already voted for and relied on. >> so where do you see this going? what do you think happens tonight? what do you think happens tomorrow? >> well, of course, i don't know what's going to happen tonight. obviously the republicans are meeting with themselves to see whether or not they have the votes to pass what john boehner has offered as a purely partisan alternative. we were not involved in those discussions. we were not involved in the decisions. and it's interesting that even in their own party it is deeply factionalized, deeply divided paint, divided against their leadership, angry at their leadership, and a party that is divided itself has difficulty working with the president or working with us. and that's unfortunate. and the country is the poorer for it. and the image of america is poorer for it. and i would hope that
. not only as we wind down the two wars in afghanistan and iraq, i think as a general principle, we have to have a much more what i would call in mechanical factor on our resources, regardless of which branch of the service we are talking about. keep the military strong, make sure we are protecting our veterans, which we have not done a very good job at. i don't think we need the amount of money we're spending now for every military -- every apparatus we can think of. i don't think we can continue down that trail any longer. we cannot afford it and we don't need it. host: congressman bill pascrell is with us for another 15 minutes. republican -- helen, republican line. guest: good morning, helen. caller: i used to be a substitute teacher. the school i had had supplies. it was blessed. but the administration in our county is bloated, its bloated. because i was a substitute teacher, i listened. there is so much administrative and bureaucratic money wasted on education. but you holler, oh, the poor children and teachers, which is correct, but so much money is wasted in bureaucracy -- wasted
social security but not the wife of a soldier in afghanistan. that's not such a good idea. maybe we won't pay the veterans benefit. we'll pay the idea. not such a good idea. what about those 12 million to 15 million students head ofd to college in the next few weeks with a student grant or staopbt loan from the federal government?shall we pay those je public colleges take care of their own? you see what can happen if we had a country, especially a country like the united states, which instead of paying all of its obleses on time, whether it is to china or japan or grandma or to the veteran, that we begin to selectively pay those bills when we had the money. i think i know what would happen. instead of being able to borrow money for ten years at 3%, we might have to pay a little more for it. let's say it just went from 3% to 4%, what would mean to us? it would mean, according to the congressional budget office, that the taxpayers would have to pay $1.3 trillion more in interest over ten years. so if it goes up to 5%, that's twice that. or it goes up to 3% -- that's what happens when you
with a situation like 9/11 or the war in iraq or afghanistan are terrorism? what if there is unforeseen event that would force government to spend more money than it takes an? guest: the legislation would have to be written to be including situations when we get like that. i am no expert on the u.s. economy so i want to put that disclaimer out there right now. but we are spending more than we're taking in and it is not sustainable. we cannot continue down this path. when you have the medicare board of trustees coming out in the month of may and releasing a report that says, if medicare is not reformed in 2024, it will be bankrupt, it is irresponsible for washington not to do anything about their when you know you are facing this problem. we need to deal with that. we need to do some entitlement reform across the board. we cannot balance the u.s. budget by cutting discretionary spending. host: i realize that this is still coming together so the information continues to evolve. but based on what we hear this morning, it is a $1.4 trillion increase in the debt limit immediately. based on misinfo
the savings would come from iraq and afghanistan and don't materialize and votes on a balanced budget amendment but what the democrats reviews to do is tie an increase in the debt ceiling to passing the balanced budget amendment. you can see the rough outlines of a deal. any deal would have to go back to the house. would these conservatives especially tea party members that speaker boehner had to make concessions to, what would they do if it comes back monday night just hours before the deadline, would they vote for that? >> 201 votes in favor of this legislation. right now 196. take a look. as of now 12 republicans have bolted from the leadership from john boehner, the speaker, and eric cantor the majority leader and right now 12 republicans have voted against and still not there. 216. there is still plenty of time left. nine minutes plus for this vote to conclude. it's a fascinating development as you say. by the way, we're told john boehner was mulling around and didn't seem overly concerned but it is still not a done deal yet. once this does pass, john, assuming it passes, gets 21
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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